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Getting Help - Treatment

Explaining Drug Addiction

Drug addiction is a disease that causes long term changes in the brain that's characterized by an uncontrollable urge to seek out and use drugs despite knowledge of all the harmful consequences. These adjustments in the mind can prompt to the hurtful practices found in individuals who take drugs. It's also easy to relapse back into drug addiction. Relapse is returning to a habit of drug use after a serious attempt to stop using.


Addiction starts when the decision to take drugs is first made. However, as time passes, an individual's ability to decide not to use drugs weakens. The need to obtain and consume the drug becomes a driving force. The major cause of this it how long term drug exposure alters brain activity. The parts of the brain that control reward and motivation, learning and memory, and self control are all significantly affected by addiction.

Drug dependency is an illness that alters both brain functions and actions.


Can Drug Addiction Be Treated?

There is, but it is a long journey. Drug dependency is a long-time illness from which it is not possible to quit at will and remain clean. Most users require repeated or long-term care to quit using it altogether and get their lives back.


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An addict in treatment must work toward the following:

  • quit utilising drugs
  • remain drug-free
  • be profitable in the family, at work and in the public arena

Values Of Successful Rehabilitation

Ongoing scientific research since the 1970s has shown that the following basic principles should be the basis of any effective course of treatment:

  • Addiction is a complicated, chronic disease that affects the brain and behaviour, but it is treatable.
  • No cure-all treatment plan fits everybody.
  • Easy access to rehab is of utmost importance.
  • Treatment deals with more than just drug use, addressing all of the patient's needs.
  • Adhering to treatment sufficiently long is critical.
  • The prevalently applied types of treatment include counselling and some other therapies that centre on behaviours.
  • When medications are administered in conjunction with behavioural therapies, they form a valuable part of the treatment.
  • Treatment procedures must be measured frequently and altered to fit the patient's evolving needs.
  • Mental illnesses associated with drug dependency need to be treated too.
  • The first step during treatment involves detoxification that is overseen by medical personnel.
  • Patients do not necessarily enrol for treatment by choice.
  • When in treatment, possible drug use must be constantly monitored.
  • Treatment projects ought to test patients for HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, tuberculosis and different chronic infections in addition show them about strides they can go for broke of these illnesses.

How Drug Dependency Is Treated?

Different steps are involved in effective treatments:

  • detoxification (the process through which drug is expelled from the body)
  • Psychological therapist
  • medication (for tobacco, opioid, or alcohol addiction)
  • evaluation and treatment for mental health issues like anxiety and depression that co-occur with addiction
  • Relapse prevention through long-term check-ups

Success could be achieved through different types of care that come with customised treatment method and follow-up options.


During the rehabilitation, both physical and psychological issues are treated. Often, community or family based recovery groups or support systems are used as part of follow up care.


How Are Medications Used In Drug Addiction Treatment?

Administered under professional supervision, prescription medicines are used to help the patient ease into a life without the effects of the drug, stop cravings and manage associated ailments.

  • Withdrawal During a detox, medication can assist in suppressing withdrawal symptoms. Detoxification is just the very first step in the process and not "treatment" in itself. Those who stop at detox will most likely relapse into drug abuse again. According to a study, 80% of detoxifications used medications (SAMHSA, 2014).
  • Preventing A Relapse The cravings for drugs can be lowered and normal brain functions restored in the patients with the help of medications. There are medications for the treatment of addictions to alcohol, tobacco/nicotine, and opioids, such as heroin or prescription pain pills. Scientists are also currently developing additional medications to treat addiction to marijuana and stimulants, like cocaine and methamphetamines. Individuals who utilize more than one drug, which is extremely normal, require treatment for the majority of the substances they utilise.

What About Behavioural Therapies And Drug Addiction

Patients are assisted by behavioural therapies to:

  • Change their conducts and practices linked with drug usage
  • Learn to exercise healthy life skills
  • continue receiving medication and other types of treatment

Patients can get treatment in a wide range of settings with different approaches.

Outpatient treatment is an option where a wide range of programs are available for patients who continue to visit behavioural health professionals regularly. Individual and group therapy, or a combination of both are involved in most treatment programs.


Different types of behavioural therapy are dished out by these programs, and they include:

  • cognitive-behavioural therapy, which helps patients perceive, dodge and adapt to the circumstances in which they are destined to utilise drugs
  • multidimensional family therapy-devised for teenagers with substance dependency issues as well as their families-which looks at a series of influences on their substance abuse patterns and is created to better family functioning in general
  • Motivational interviewing has been used to prepare a patient to accept their problem and wants to change their actions by seeking help
  • Motivational impetuses (possibility management), which utilizes uplifting feedback to support restraint from medications

sometimes, intensive treatments that involve several outpatient sessions every week is given at first. After the completion of the in-depth treatment, a patient moves to frequent outpatient treatment, which does not meet as regularly and for fewer hours every week to assist with maintaining his/her recovery.


Inpatient or private treatment can likewise be extremely compelling, particularly for those with more serious issues (including co-happening conditions). Authorised residential treatment centre offers 24-hour organized and proper care, including safe lodging and medicinal consideration. Inpatient treatment facilities can use many therapeutic approaches and are usually working toward assisting the patient after treatment to maintain a drug free, crime free lifestyle.


Benefits of taking an inpatient treatment programme:

  • A therapeutic community that is a very structured programme in which a patient stays at a residence, usually for 6 months to a year. Everybody at the facility, whether caregivers or administrators and fellow patients play a role in the recovery of the patient helping them cope with the changes and challenges of withdrawal.
  • Shorter-term residential treatment, where detoxification is done and the patient prepared for community based treatment through preliminary intensive counselling.
  • Recovery housing that offers supervised, short-term accommodation for a patient, frequently after other kinds of inpatient/residential treatment. The recovery housing programme provides a bridge for the patients between the long term inpatient facility and re-joining the society; patients are helped to prepare for life on the outside by enabling them to look for jobs and learn how to take care and budget their money.

Challenges Of Re-Entering Society

Habitual intake of drugs alters the normal functions of the brain, and various things can cause one to have a burning desire to take the drugs. Patients at a residential rehab centre or a prison facility when undergoing treatment are taught how to tell what drives them to take drugs, how to avoid and also cope with those things once they re-join society.